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Statistical Data: Population

Sources of statistical data.

Decennial Census and American Community Survey

The Decennial Census has been taken by the Census Bureau every 10 years, 1790-2010. Data are available for many geographies, from the US down to the block level. Data include demographic, social, economic and housing data through Census 2000. Beginning with the 2010 Census, social, economic, and housing data are not available; use American Community Survey data instead. For data, please see our Census Statistics Research Guide.

The American Community Survey is an ongoing Census Bureau survey that provides 1-, 3-, and 5- year estimates every year beginning with the 2007 data release. Data include demographic, social, economic and housing data. Data are available for many geographies, from the US down to the block group level. Data are available via data.census.gov. For more information, see the Census Bureau's American Community Survey website or ask us.

Decennial Census and American Community Survey data and easy-to-create maps are also available from Social Explorer.

Mean center of population
Source: Statistical Abstract of the United States, 2012, p. 17.

Sources for Population Estimates and Projections

A population estimate is a calculation of the number of people as of a particular date. A population projection is an estimate of the population for future dates.

Title & locationYearsGeographySourceContent
Population: 1790-2000 1790–2000 US Historical Statistics of the United States, Census Bureau Annual estimates. Includes a table on Sex, Age, Race, and Marital Status.
Population and Housing Unit Estimates 1900- U.S., state, county, place, county subdivisions, metropolitan areas, etc. Census Bureau Annual estimates. Some tables are broken down by age, sex, race, Hispanic origin.
Population Projections 1995-2100 US Census Bureau Projections. Some tables are broken down by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Population Clock.

About

Major sources are listed to the left.

The Statistical Abstract of the United States (section 1) is another great place to start looking. Even if the data that you want are not there, look at the footnotes for relevant tables and the introduction to section 1 for pointers to more comprehensive sources. Previous editions, 1878-, are also available.

For historical population data, the Statistical Abstract can be supplemented by Historical Statistics of the United States.

Please contact us if you would like assistance with data!

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